ABSTRACT ILLUSIONISM

Dates: 1975-1985

Origin: United States

Key Artists: Michael B. Gallagher, Jack Reilly

Abstract Illusionism, a name coined by Louis K. Meisel, is an artistic movement that came into prominence in the United States during the mid 1970s. Works consisted of both hard-edge and expressionistic abstract painting styles that employed the use of perspective, artificial light sources, and cast shadows to achieve the illusion of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. Abstract Illusionism differed from traditional Trompe L’oeil (fool the eye) art in that the pictorial space seemed to project in front of, or away from, the canvas surface, as opposed to receding into the picture plane as in traditional painting. Primarily, though, these were abstract paintings, as opposed to the realism of Trompe l’Oeil.

Wikipedia contributors. “Abstract Illusionism.” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 2 Jul. 2009. Web. 12 Mar. 2010. <en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abstract_Illusionism>

Michael B. Gallagher

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